Apr 30 2020

Advice for Choosing a Major or Minor at EMU

by blogemu

Eastern Michigan University

.

  .       College is hard. We can all admit that. It’s even harder when you don’t know why you’re here or what you want to study. Trust me, I’ve been there. I have changed my major from pre-business to nursing and then to communication. I will be sharing personal tips that I have learned throughout my college journey that have helped me pick a major and minor that matters to me.

.

Take off the pressure

.

The moment that you start applying for college, there are multiple people telling us what we’re supposed to be. A doctor. A lawyer. A dentist. All of these professions are great. But if they do not set your heart on fire, please beware. Who cares what other people want and like? Figure out what you like. Do you write well? Do you speak well? Do you like to problem solve or are you a great organizer? Knowing these things can be beneficial in choosing your major. Take online quizzes. Ask around. One day, you’ll wake up and know exactly what you want to do. It might not be today. Breathe.

.

Trial and error

..

Nothing like good ol’ trial and error. We sometimes have to take the journey less traveled and just experiment. That’s what I’ve done in terms of my college major and minor. I would recommend utilizing GenEd classes to discover what naturally piques your interest. After taking Philosophy or Africology, you might realize that you want to take your career in a different direction. Don’t be afraid to make changes as you go. You can declare a major and then decide on something else. Just know how important time is. Don’t waste it.

.

Advisors are great

..

As a transfer student, I was in an interesting place. I had 30 credits from my first institution and some community college courses under my belt. Yet, I was interested in starting over new. When I went to Eastern Michigan University’s Transfer Open House, I had Communication & Theatre Arts as my major. The advisor looked at me and said I should major in Communication. The Communication course curriculum resonated with me and Communication became my major. Now, my experience was unique. I was given direction by an advisor and it clicked. For you, it may not be that easy. That’s perfectly fine. Go to your advisor at the University Advising and Career Development Center (https://www.emich.edu/uacdc/index.php) with a list of jobs you might be interested in. They can easily help you pick a major revolving around that career path.


About the writer:

Gabrielle Reed is a senior majoring in Communication and double-minoring in Leadership and Women and Gender Studies. She is an Honors College Student and a McNair Scholar. After graduation, she plans to pursue a career in the media as well as teaching on the university level. She is a Resident Advisor, a sister in the You Beautiful Black Woman Epsilon Chapter, and she is apart of organizations such as Black Media Association and many others.

Apr 23 2020

Day in the Life of a Quarantined Dietetic Student

by blogemu

.

. Over the last several years, I developed some healthy habits that I believe are crucial to my everyday well-being. With a busy schedule and constant due dates, I sometimes questioned the importance of these habits and their impact on my health. Then, in an instant, COVID-19 (coronavirus) made the world come to an abrupt halt.

.

A few days into working from home, I realized that “stay home, stay safe” does not mean quit my daily routine. Rather, this time in quarantine has allowed me to embrace my healthy habits as much as I can and recognize how important they are to my sanity. These healthy habits have helped me cope with the chaos and uncertainty that COVID-19 has created.

.

Here is a breakdown of a day in the life of a quarantined dietetic student:
.
Wake & Breakfast: I start each day of quarantine by waking up around 8-9am, or whenever my body wakes me up. I like to drink a big glass of water as the body gets dehydrated during sleep. Then, I make a delicious oatmeal breakfast consisting of oats, banana, cinnamon, nuts, raisins and peanut butter. My oatmeal is definitely my favorite thing about my mornings. I also drink coffee while eating and studying for my next upcoming exam.

.

Exercise: The next thing I like to accomplish is getting my workout out of the way. Getting it done early in the morning helps me feel more productive for the rest of the day and helps me focus on any homework. I try to exercise every day through a walk/run, weight lifting, or yoga. Lately, I enjoy walking on an inclined treadmill for 30 minutes while listening to a recorded lecture. Studying while exercising is a win-win.

.

Drink, drink, drink! A habit of mine is always having my water bottle with me. I try to drink 8 glasses of water a day because it helps me feel more alert and awake.

.

Planning: In order to maximize my productivity in the day, I use a planner to keep track of the tasks, homework, activities and other things in my busy life that I need to accomplish either that day or that week. I have used a planner for 5 years now and without it, I would have undoubtedly fallen apart. Just 15 minutes of planning each day keeps me organized and on task.

.

Pampering: With my busy schedule, another habit I maintain is setting time aside to de-stress. I do this by either taking a bath, putting on a face mask, painting my nails, baking, or drinking a hot glass of tea. Just one relaxing, pampering activity helps me recharge for the next day.

.

Bedtime: My last healthy habit for the day is reading 10 pages of any book each night before bed, but NOT textbooks. Bedtime is around 10-11pm and reading helps me mentally wind down for the day. Maintaining a consistent bedtime means that I wake around the same time each morning, keeping the rest of my healthy habits consistent.

.

.

About the writer:

.

Hello! My name is Laura Holton. I am a dietetics student in the Bachelors program here at EMU. My hobbies include exercising, being outside, baking and cooking. 

Apr 23 2020

How to Use Your Quarantine to Start a Food Journal

by blogemu

. If you’re stuck at home as a result of the Coronavirus quarantine and have established a few unhealthy snacking habits, then chances are you may put on a few excess pounds. To counteract this, consider tracking your intake during quarantine. Food journaling has shown to help with weight loss; and the best part? It can be as personalized (that is, as vague or as detailed) as you want it to be.

.
What’s a food journal? It’s a tool that is used to track your meals, snacks, fluid intake, among other stats. Food journals can be helpful to self-reflect or identify unhealthy eating patterns, and help identify how your intake relates to certain times of the day or emotional states. In addition, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says journaling can help positively reinforce new healthy behaviors, promotes mindfulness, accountability, and can lead to more good choices.

.
How should you track? This decision is totally up to you. While most people today keep digital food journals, “pen-and-paper” types might find that keeping a physical journal is more effective. Even more creative still, there are those who use photo-journaling to track their intake. One new app, called Bitesnap, does just this. Other digital apps like MyFitnessPal or CalorieKing are more common, but you can also make your own template on word processing software such as OneNote.

.
What should you track? In addition to food and fluids, tracking other measurements like weight or minutes of physical activity can help you monitor and achieve other fitness goals. However, beware of the temptation of making a food journal too detailed starting out. While some people find it helpful to track calories or grams of macronutrients for each food item, this can be time-consuming, overwhelming, and discouraging to those with busy lifestyles. Start with the basics, then add details as you go.
The name of the game is consistency. Since it takes around 6 months (and not the 21-days we’ve all heard before) to establish a habit, the thought of keeping a daily food journal may seem daunting. Keep in mind, your journal doesn’t have to be perfect to be effective. Research shows that those who track their food intake, even just most of the time, are more successful with weight management than those who don’t track at all. For more tips and information on how to successfully keep a food journal for weight loss, visit https://www.eatthis.com/food-journal-guide/.

.

About the writer:
.

My name is Eduardo Paredes, and I am a proud Master’s Dietetic student here at EMU. I am passionate about food, and enjoy cooking, binge-watching TV shows, or spending time with my three toy poodles. Being in quarantine has made me miss dining out with friends.